Wednesday, March 10, 2010

From 2D to 3D- without those annoying glasses.




One of the most enjoyable (and yes, sometimes horrifying) things about working in animation is seeing my work in the hands of other artists. Top among these pleasures is seeing a drawing translated into sculpture. I've worked with some great modelers at Blue Sky Studios over the years and I can easily say that finding a character in clay is one of the most exciting parts of the process. It requires a respectful dialogue between the designer and sculptor and a lot of trust. I am the first to admit that my designs are often too loose to sculpt with any real accuracy. They are sometimes cavalier little doodles that look good on the page, but offer little in the way of solid information for the purposes of translating it to three dimensions. That's where the sculptor's skill comes in. He or she needs to be able to interpret the sketch and somehow wrestle it into our reality. Alena Wooten, one of Blue Sky's top sculptors, seems to be refining that skill every day. She came into the studio recently and unvieled this beautiful piece which I had been completely unaware of until that moment. She based it on a little drawing I published in a collection of sketches several years ago and I am truly impressed by the result. I am usually standing over the sculptor's shoulder niggling over every last detail, but this appeared fully realized, with nary a peep from me. The dog is not quite finished but after some convincing, Alena allowed me to share it with you.

19 comments:

  1. AWW! You're such fun to work with Peter! You're characters are the best to work from! Thank you for your kindness, and all the inspiration you give to me and everyone out there! Your characters have so much energy and personality, it's almost impossible to capture all of it! I'm so honored!

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  2. Verdaderamente inspiradores son tus personajes Peter, me alegra ver que alguien los pueda traducir a 3d.

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  3. really amazing piece! I like how theres a definite sense of weight. when you coming to Toronto??

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  4. in the drawing it looks like he has running legs... a bit is lost in 3D, you can't have the grizzled, hairy look quite as much.

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  5. Very impressive translation. The differences between the two are pretty negligible. As for the grizzled, hairy look, they should stick some Brillo wire "hairs" in his legs.

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  6. That is a BEAUTIFUL model! And the sketch is one of my favorites from the Sketchbook. If that was a mass-produced statue, I'd surely buy one!

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  7. Awesome stuff! I love how both pieces have a lot of energy. This reminds me a bit of James Gurney's recent book and about his process of making a sculpture to use as reference for his paintings. Have you ever done this?

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  8. Wow, that's a beautiful sketch!

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  9. Great sculpt! Fun to see a 3D translation of your sketch:)

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  10. That sculpt is awesome, but your sketch even more fantastic to look at! Love your sketches!!!

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  11. Amazing, both the sketch and the model. Inspiring.

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  12. WOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWWWW!!!!!!!!!! AWESOME!!! WORK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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